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20121001
20121031
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KGO (ABC) 20
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English 20
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
already cancelling flights. even talk about shutting down the new york transit. hurricane irene wasn't that bad. i'm not going to worry this time, sam. >> dan, we were right over here. the thing about hurricane irene, we got to remember, it was a very bad storm, it brought a lot of rain and a lot of flooding to inland areas. it didn't do the coastal damage. all of the problems that you could have with this system, coastal damage is just one, then you have rain, wind and then flooding. in this case, you have snow as well. you got those five points. maybe one point wasn't as bad in irene in the biggest part of new york. but i'll tell you in the biggest population center of new york, but that was a bad storm for a lot of folks. be prepared for this storm to have a stronger coastal effects. it may be more wind and more rain if these forecasters are right this morning. our ginger zee is right now in atlantic city, where they're getting ready for that. i remember that coastline, it barely ramps out from the water to where those casinos are, good morning. >> i have lost everything. i have n
. >> reporter: last year, during tropical storm irene, the waters came within less than a foot from topping the flood walls. and now, sandy's storm surge is predicted to be even stronger. since irene failed to do the damage here in new york city that many experts predicted, some people, like this family, who live in the evacuation zone, are refusing to heed the warnings for sandy. >> we have diapers, we have water. you know, just hoping to make the best of it. >> reporter: there are long lines at the supermarket tonight. >> it really is a mad house. >> reporter: yeah. >> like, oh, my god. >> reporter: but the streets are crackling not with panic, but with a sort of upbeat, pre-apocalyptic vibe. >> i'm a new yorker. come on, what do you want to do? what do you want to do? panic? we're new yorkers. >> reporter: hard not to enjoy her spirit. agree with her or not. one last bit of news from new york, david. the new york stock exchange announcing late today that they will be closed tomorrow, however, people will still be able to trade stocks online electronically. back to you. >> she was a class
quickly to change positions. already we've had more water from sandy than we did last year from irene. we're being told that protectively they'll shut off power down here soon so we hope everybody has gotten somewhere safe. sandy is coming. the question is, how will new york city handle it? the big apple has been shut down to its core. lower manhattan looks like a ghost town. wall street will be closed for consecutive days because of weather for the first time since the 1800s in a place where you have to look up to see where many live, skyscrapers are a concern. wind speeds on the ground are half those on the top floors. sometimes forcing buildings to sway. >> the further up you live the more reason you should close your drapes and just stay away from windows. >> reporter: watch this bath water slosh in a brookline high-rise in gusts of barely 40 miles an hour. half what's expected from sandy. at ground zero still under construction special precautions as teals have worked for days to disassembly a mashed down piece of machinery. fears heightened by that ten-ton steel arm dangling from a
including this one. so only twice before irene being one of them. here's why. the storm is still 24 to 36 hours away. the flow starting to flow up over that and you see this barrier, it could easily with a 10 to 20-foot rise wave up and there's the iconic boardwalk some being boarded up so taking it very seriously not only here in atlantic city but through the barrier islands up the jersey shore. and that's who it's going to hit. right to those graphics. i need to show you who will get what and when. that storm surge very important. i want to show you exactly what to expect here. 6 to 9 feet in that red area or 4 to 8 feet, excuse me, in that magenta area and then the blue still, you've got a 1 to 3-foot surge and all coming from the southeast end to the northwest. let me show you the wind forecast, because sam showed you how big and how many people will be involved in this. but look at how high those wind speeds go, 60 to 80 miles per hour, pittsburgh, d.c., new york city and boston in that red zone, and, of course, it extends all the way back to the eastern great lakes too. we'll watch
year, hurricane irene had less than five feet of surge. but that made driving through the wall street area an adventure. new york city is lucky to have the high-rises. be very clear. this ain't irene. the water will come. could be 8, 10, 12 feet high. as brave as you are, we won't be here tomorrow morning in this spot. >> we won't. a lot of tourists are out now, now gnat we have daylight out. there's much more of the storm to come. we'll cover it all morning long. >> let's take a look at the tourists. times square normally crammed with traffic at this time. people out there walking around, taking it all in. sandy has forced new york city officials to shut down the subways for the second time in in city's history. josh, a lot fewer people than usual. >> it's not just less crowded. everything here is shuttered. the winds pick up the rain again starts to fall. this is a subway station closed for business. not the only station that is. every station throughout the city is closed as new york prepares for the superstorm. this morning, the largest transit system in the country closed down. t
much for the water to come up over the walls. last year, for hurricane irene, these residents had to be evacuated. this time around, they're ready for the worst. east coast communities going on the offensive. building sand walls, securing property and stocking up on supplies, as the superstorm closes in. after being pounded last year by hurricane irene with its record storm surge and feet of flooding, new york residents are once again bracing for the worst. damage from irene topped $14 billion. and sandy could wreak even more havoc. >> i lost everything in my basement. i had up to ten feet of water in my house. this is a concern. >> reporter: governor cuomo has declared a state of emergency in preparation for sandy's impact. and mayor michael bloomberg warned new york city residents to brace themselves. >> high winds that could force certain bridges to be closed. >> reporter: last year, in advance of irene, mayor bloomberg made the unprecedented order to evacuate low-lying areas of the city and shut down the subway system. as sandy barrels north, the city's more than 7 million str
to clear but also to get, for example, the power companies back in. >> reporter: during hurricane irene last year, about 6 million homes lost electricity. this researcher plugged in all the information into a new program, and he believes this will be worse. >> our estimate at this point is 10 million. it could be higher. it could be lower. >> reporter: 10 million or more without power for a week to ten days, which is why this wisconsin company has added extra shifts, trying to build as many portable generators as quickly as possible. officials worry that residents might misuse some of those generators, putting them indoors, or stringing extension cords dangerously. many seem to be heeding the warnings, checking off their lists of preparedness, batteries, water, nonperishable food. >> i'm nervous about losing power. i'm nervous about the storm. >> reporter: some of the best advice from officials, if a tree takes down one of your power lines, leave the power line alone. leave the tree limb alone as well. let the power company take care of it. david kerley, abc news, rehoboth beach, delawa
irene, which hit last august in the same area. but by any measure, this storm, seemingly crushed irene. there really is no comparison, right? >> there's no comparison. i guess you could say, this is kind of like new york city's katrina. just devastating impacts here. this historic surge, 13 feet. all of that water coming on and those high wind gusts. worst-case scenario did pan out here, unfortunately. >> all right. mark mancuso, from accuweather. thanks for joining us this morning, mark. >>> straight ahead, more of our continuing coverage of sandy. the airlines trying to get back to normalcy. and what the red cross is doing to help out. >>> plus, more incredible video from across the storm zone, including rescues that didn't have to happen. we'll be right back. new pink lemonade 5-hour energy? 5-hour energy supports the avon foundation for women breast cancer crusade. >>> welcome back, everyone. 5 million people take the new york city subways every day. and this morning, the entire system is shut down. seven subway tunnels under the east river are flooded. and the electricity that pow
a blustery, nasty day. >> before this made landfall, this storm seemingly crushed irene. there really is no comparison, right? >> there's no comparison. i guess you could say, this is kind of like new york city's katrina. just devastating impacts here. this historic surge, 13 feet, all that water coming on in and the high wind gusts. worst-case scenario did pan out here unfortunately. >> all right. mark mann cue sew from accuweather. the airlines trying to get back to normalcy and what the red cau cross is doing to help out. >> plus more incredible rescues that didn't have to happen. we'll be right back. en. we'll be right back. >> announcer: "america this morning" brought to you by 5 hour energy. 5-hour energy supports the avon foundation for women breast cancer crusade. so i can get the energized feeling i need and support a great cause? i'm sold. pink lemonade 5-hour energy? yeah and a portion of every sale goes to the avon foundation for women breast cancer crusade. i'm sold. new pink lemonade 5-hour energy. get the alert, energized feeling you need and support breast cancer resea
what to expect at this point. we had irene here, had winds of 80 miles-per-hour sustained, and that was -- >> forecasters fear sandy could u-merge with the cold front, bringing up to a foot of rain in parts. heavy snow could also be possible in the appalachian mountain region, public transportation in new york and new jersey is ramping down, and officials in new york city announced the evacuation of 375,000 residents in low-lying areas. new york city mayor michael bloomberg had a message for those considering riding out the storms. >> if you don't evacuate you're not just putting ourown life in danger, you're also endangering the lives of the first responder who have to rescue you. >> sandy has been blamed for dozens of deaths in the caribbean. mostly in haiti. >> sandy is stranding hundreds of thousands of travelers. dozens of flights to the east coast from all three bay area airports have been cancelled. the mass roman is live from the airport. reporter: passengerses are usually furious at the airlines when there are this many cancellations or delays but mother nature is
." capable of causing more damage than hurricane irene last year. the height of the storm should be tuesday, and it will take its sweet time making an exit. churning in the atmosphere over the same spots for five or even six days. now, depending on where you live, it may bring up to six inches of rain, 80-mile-per-hour wind gusts, 20 to 30-foot high seas and extreme coastal flooding. it's all during a full moon, too, when tides are even higher. it could even bring half a foot of heavy, wet snow as far inland as ohio. >> 60% chance that sandy will hit us. >> reporter: that's why east coast emergency management teams are gearing up and extra help is being brought in from other states. emergency officials up and down the east coast are warning people that you can't wait. you have to get your emergency kits and emergency plans in place now. diane? >> ginger, thank you so much. now abc's weather editor sam champion is here. show us these giant forces of nature about to collide, sam. >> reporter: superstorm, monster storm. this one has three ingredients, diane, so, let's run through them. first o
combining the destructive power of hurricane irene, which did $14 billion in damage last year, with the punishing nor'easter of 2009 that brought catastrophic flooding. and then, add in a freezing cold winter temperature, all in one storm. >> this storm is going to be destructive, historic and unfortunately, life-threatening. >> reporter: another fear, the extreme coastal surge that's expected. anywhere from 4 to 10 feet. areas like washington, d.c. are already vulnerable to flooding, and because of the full moon monday, which means higher than normal tides, places like atlantic city could see a swamping ten-foot storm surge. that's also possible for new jersey and new york, where evacuation orders may be enforced in coastal areas. even new york city's subways are at risk of flooding. mayor bloomberg says they may be closed as sandy approaches. for more on the damage sandy is already doing, we go up the florida coast to my extreme weather team colleague ginger zee. ginger? >> reporter: sam, cocoa beach is known as one of the widest beaches in the state of florida, but not toni
and check in on her neighbors. >> let me take a chance. we left for irene and we felt we didn't really have to go. so that's why we stayed. >> a flashlight. >> i don't have one. >> reporter: but nightfall brought regret. the power is out. the water outside rising. >> it is 6:55 and the power just went out. so we're officially screwed. >> reporter: "20/20" producers are here with mary when they spot flames down the block lighting up the flooded streets. they flee to a rooftop they hope will be safe. >> there's water everywhere, and embers flying. >> it's like the apocalypse. i mean there's like that fire. we've evacuated. this is real. >> reporter: this is a community that has been hit hard before losing 32 people on 9/11. today, residents stoically faced their newest disaster, vowing they will come back again. elizabeth vargas, abc news, breezy point, queens. >> thank you so much, elizabeth, and elizabeth will have more tonight on our special edition of "20/20" the perfect storm at 10:00 p.m. eastern tonight. >>> coming up right here our sam champion here, what he saw in this storm he says
johnson has more. >> when irene medina returned to high school this fall she had plenty of stories to tell about her summer job. >> i did my first surgery in iraq. it was interesting and exciting for me. >> instead of flipping burgers , she was helping researchers at ucsf understand brain function. it is helping newborn infants survive brain traumas and other injuries. >> i started thinking, what they are doing is something great. >> across the bay at the university of california, they were doing great science too working on a study that could some day help human muscles regenerate. >> we saw improved muscle regeneration, actually. it was interesting. >> the path into these high end labs began with internship programs from the california institute of regenerative medicine. once in the program they are assigned mentors to gather them in real life lab assignments. >> they get down to the genetic level and cellular level, and they really understand that their specific part of the project including the literature. >> the grants help fund internships including at ucsf, children's berkeley. >> i
. >> when irene medina returned to high school this fall she had plenty of stories to tell about her summer job. >> i did my first surgery in iraq. it was interesting and exciting for me. >> instead of flipping burgers , she was helping researchers at ucsf understand brain function. it is helping newborn infants survive brain traumas and other injuries. >> i started thinking, what they are doing is something great. >> across the bay at the university of california, they were doing great science too working on a study that could some day help human muscles regenerate. >> we saw improved muscle regeneration, actually. it was interesting. >> the path into these high end labs began with internship programs from the california institute of regenerative medicine. once in the program they are assigned mentors to gather them in real life lab assignments. >> they get down to the genetic level and cellular level, and they really understand that their specific part of the project including the literature. >> the grants help fund internships including at ucsf, children's berkeley. >> i think it is an e
, hurricane irene last year cost 4.3 billion. core logic which monitors housing market says 88 billion dollars worth of property stands at risk of storm surge in seven states from virginia to massachusetts. >>> 5:56. 33 new fire department recruits in san jose begin training today the largest number the city has trained at one time. 8.6 grant provided by fema will pay for the new firefighters the recruits will bring the department back to 683 firefighters shy of what the department had four years ago. next, we are continuing to follow hurricane sandy, bearing down on the east coast. you are looking at a live picture from portsmouth, virginia hundreds of thousands on the east coast have had to evacuate. thousands of flights grounded. >> cleanup this morning after a rowdy celebration in san francisco following giants world series victory. good morning! wow. want to start the day with something heart healthy and delicious? you're a talking bee... honey nut cheerios has whole grain oats that can help lower cholesterol. and it tastes good? sure does! right... ♪ wow. delicious, right? yeah. it's t
in damage that hurricane sandy will leave in its wake. >> it can be worse than irene did damage up here last year. >>> a look now at your weather on this friday morning while things are still relatively calm. what a rough news day, man. miami, daytona, and orlando could see squalls at a result of hurricane sandy. a new storm system brings rain and snow to the pacific northwest. meanwhile, santa ana winds blow through southern california again. >> mild and humid in baltimore, no, and boston. billings warms up to 34. sounds like a warm-up. and so much colder than usual. >> break out the tank tops. >> that's right. omaha and kansas city are in the mid-40s. >>> and now in the race to finish line in the campaign for president, our latest poll shows the candidates are still close. governor romney's lead is growing. with 11 days to go our abc news/washington post poll showing romney with 50% support among likely voters versus 47% for president obama. but that 3-point difference is still within the margin of error. >>> another key race with national implications is unfolding in the state of massachu
. we look at the video from where irene hit this area last year. you can see that the sand mounds and the seawalls that are intended to be the front line of defense for a storm, they were no match for the heavy rains and winds. water just poured right in. as a result, there was massive flooding, mandatory evacuations. and people in this area, once again, bracing, preparing themselves for the worst. sam? >> thank you, linsey. thank you, ginger. if you've seen the spaghetti models, they're turning this thing towards the coastline. a lot of terms are out there. atmospheric bomb. superstorm. at the same time, joking terms like frankenstorm are used. we turn to one of my good friends, expert senior meteorologist bernie rayno from accuweather. when you hear the terms, how much of it is hype on this storm? and how much is very real? >> when you've been in this field as long as you and i have been, sam, you look for a way out when you see a storm that's projected to be this strong. but unfortunately, i don't believe there is a way out. this is not being overhyped. i would use the terms de
time. >> last year, with hurricane irene, i stocked my refrigerator. but that was not the smartest thing because our food went bad. so, we have a lot of crackers and cereal. and peanut butter crackers. >> reporter: many residents stocked up on bottled water. if you didn't have time, you can make tap water drinkable. for every gallon you need, add one-eighth of a teaspoon of house hold bleach to purify it. but let it stand for 30 minutes before consuming. >> that was fun! >> reporter: another great tip for parents with small kids, take advantage of the daylight. >> run them around during the day. then off to bed early. >> reporter: there's no video games. there's no computer. how is that for you? >> partly, i think it's awesome because i love to read. >> reporter: you need a flashlight and a good book? >> yes. >> reporter: that's great advice. and what about those of us who can't seem to live without our e-mails? you can power up mobile devices in the car. just make sure garage doors stay open. and cherish that charge by dimming the screen and turning off the wi-fi. need the web? ta
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)